Estyn Inspection Report 2012

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A report on

Crickhowell High School
New Road
Crickhowell
Powys
NP8 1AW

Date of inspection:  September 2012

by

Estyn, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate for Education and Training in Wales


During each inspection, inspectors aim to answer three key questions:

Key Question 1: How good are the outcomes?

Key Question 2: How good is provision?

Key Question 3: How good are leadership and management?

Inspectors also provide an overall judgement on the school’s current performance and on its prospects for improvement.

In these evaluations, inspectors use a four-point scale:

Judgement

What the judgement means

Excellent Many strengths, including significant examples of sector-leading practice
Good Many strengths and no important areas requiring significant improvement
Adequate Strengths outweigh areas for improvement
Unsatisfactory Important areas for improvement outweigh strengths

 

The report was produced in accordance with Section 28 of the Education Act 2005.

Every possible care has been taken to ensure that the information in this document is accurate at the time of going to press.  Any enquiries or comments regarding this document/publication should be addressed to:

Publication Section

Estyn
Anchor Court, Keen Road
Cardiff
CF24 5JW

or by email to publications@estyn.gov.uk

This and other Estyn publications are available on our website:  www.estyn.gov.uk

© Crown Copyright 2012:  This report may be re-used free of charge in any format or medium provided that it is re-used accurately and not used in a misleading context.  The material must be acknowledged as Crown copyright and the title of the report specified.

Publication date:  20/11/2012 

Context

Crickhowell High School is an 11-19, co-educational comprehensive school, maintained by Powys local authority.  Pupils come from the town of Crickhowell, the surrounding villages and the rural community.  A significant number chooses to come across the border from Monmouthshire.

There are currently 746 pupils on roll, an increase from the last inspection in 2006, including 198 in the sixth form.  While pupils come from the full range of  socio-economic circumstances, the vast majority come from backgrounds that are socially and economically advantaged.

Less than 5% of pupils are entitled to free school meals, which is well below the Welsh average of 17.4% for secondary schools.  About 16% of pupils are on the school’s special educational needs register.  The percentage of pupils with a statement of special educational needs is 2.7%, compared with 2.6% for Wales as a whole.

Around 4% of the school’s pupils are from a minority-ethnic or mixed-race background.  A very small proportion of pupils are learning English as an additional language.  There are virtually no pupils who speak Welsh as a first language or to an equivalent standard.

The headteacher was appointed to her post in September 2010, having previously been deputy headteacher at the school since 2006.  A new deputy headteacher took up his post in June 2012.

The individual school budget per pupil for Crickhowell High School in 2011-2012 means that the budget is £3,768 per pupil.  The maximum per pupil in the secondary schools in Powys is £4,577 and the minimum is £3,671.  Crickhowell High School is 12th out of the 13 secondary schools in Powys in terms of its school budget per pupil.

Summary

The school’s current performance

Good

The school’s prospects for improvement

Good

Current performance

Crickhowell School is a good school because:

  • standards are good and improving steadily;
  • most pupils make good progress in extending their knowledge and understanding, and in developing and refining their skills;
  • pupils feel safe and secure, are well motivated and engaged in their learning, and display well-developed social and life skills;
  • learning experiences prepare pupils effectively for the opportunities and responsibilities of adult life;
  • teaching overall enables pupils to make secure progress and prepares them well for their next stage of learning; and
  • there are effective arrangements that guide and support pupils well and contribute significantly to their health, wellbeing and learning.

Prospects for improvements

The prospects for improvement are good because:

  • the headteacher and senior leadership team provide firm and effective strategic leadership;
  • senior leaders have a clear understanding of the school’s key priorities for improvement;
  • the school development plan provides a secure basis for improvement;
  • effective partnership arrangements enhance the quality of pupils’ learning experiences and improve their wellbeing; and
  • the school manages its resources well.

Recommendations

R1 continue to raise standards, particularly in those areas where there is relative underperformance;

R2 improve curriculum organisation and provision for skills to ensure more cohesive and progressive learning experiences;

R3 improve the quality of teaching, in particular to challenge more able pupils, to match the best practice in the school;

R4 ensure greater consistency in the quality of marking; and

R5 improve the quality of self-evaluation and improvement planning at  middle-management level.

What happens next?

The school will draw up an action plan, which shows how the school is going to address the recommendations.  The local authority will monitor progress in addressing the recommendations and report their findings to Estyn.

Main findings

 

Key Question 1:  How good are outcomes?

Good

Standards:  Good

At key stage 4, the proportion of pupils attaining the level 2 threshold including English and mathematics has improved steadily since 2008.  It has placed the school in the top half of similar schools in terms of free-school-meal benchmarks throughout this period.  In 2011, performance was in line with modelled expectations.  Unverified data for 2012 shows a significant further improvement in this indicator.  Performance in those indicators that include a wide range of qualifications has improved sharply in the last four years.

Over the last three years, performance in English and mathematics has placed the school in the top half of similar schools in terms of free-school-meal benchmarks, but has been generally below family averages in this period.  Unverified data for 2012 shows improvements in these indicators.  However, performance in science has been well below similar schools’ averages in the last three years.

At key stage 3, the proportion of pupils attaining the core subject indicator has improved steadily over the last four years.  In 2012, performance was above the family average and above that to be expected when compared with modelled expectations.  Performance in English, mathematics and science has improved in the last four years and compares well with that of similar schools.

In the sixth form, students perform well with just over half of all A level entries awarded the highest A* and A grades in 2011.  All students achieved the Welsh Baccalaureate.

In the last five years, no pupil has left the school without a qualification.  The proportion staying on in full-time education after 16 is high.  Very few pupils who left school at 16 are reported as being not in education, employment and training and this proportion is much better than local authority and Wales averages.

At key stage 3, there is no significant difference between the performance of girls and boys.  At key stage 4 in 2011, the gap between the performance of boys and girls was smaller than family and Wales averages in most indicators.  This is mainly because boys perform better relative to similar schools than girls.

Pupils with special educational needs achieve well.  However, more able and talented pupils do not always make enough progress to achieve their potential.

Many pupils have a secure recall of previous learning and make good progress in lessons.  They extend their knowledge, acquire a firm understanding of new concepts, and develop and refine their skills well.  In many lessons, pupils analyse and apply a range of new information to make thoughtful and considered judgements.

In a few lessons, where pupils make particularly good progress, they tackle challenges with confidence, apply techniques systematically and use effective strategies to solve problems and carry out unfamiliar tasks.  They evaluate their work well and set themselves realistic targets for improvement.  In a minority of lessons, where pupils make limited progress, this is largely because learning activities do not challenge them enough or because their work lacks depth and detail.

Pupils’ speaking and listening skills are well developed.  They listen carefully to instructions and attentively to the views and opinions of others.  Many pupils express their ideas and opinions clearly and confidently.  More able pupils often speak very articulately.

Many read fluently and with good expression.  They are able to extract information from texts to make judgements and to produce reasoned and balanced arguments.  Those pupils who on entry to the school lack the reading skills that allow them to access all areas of the curriculum make good progress, for example in the intervention groups designed to develop these skills.

Most pupils develop their writing skills well.  They use a good range of vocabulary appropriately for effect.  Many, including less able pupils, write interesting extended accounts, spell correctly and use punctuation and grammar appropriately.  However, a few pupils make careless spelling and punctuation errors and present their work poorly.  Over time, most pupils develop their ability to write for a range of purposes and audiences well, with more able pupils producing well-structured analyses and creative compositions.

In Welsh second language at key stage 3, performance compares well with that of similar schools.  At key stage 4, only a small proportion of the cohort enter level 2 qualifications in Welsh second language, but these pupils perform well.  Outcomes for the short course are not as strong.  Pupils’ speaking skills in Welsh lessons are good.  In other contexts, pupils are acquiring greater confidence in the use of the Welsh language.

Wellbeing:  Good

Across the school, pupils feel safe and secure.  They believe that the school deals well with bullying and say that they have someone to talk to if they are worried.

Pupils have positive attitudes to healthy living and eating.  As well as campaigning successfully for the introduction of a salad bar in the canteen, the majority of pupils take part in extra-curricular sporting activities.

Pupils are well motivated and engaged in their learning, and work productively.  In lessons and while moving around the school and the local community, pupils behave well.  They are very courteous and co-operative, and show respect for each other, staff and members of the public.  Pupils are very effective ambassadors for the school.

Attendance rates are broadly in line with those of similar schools.  There have been no permanent exclusions in recent years and the number of fixed-term exclusions is low.

Pupils participate in a wide range of activities that enable them to take responsibility and influence the work of the school.  For example, the school council is a successful forum for listening to pupils’ views.  Pupils contribute usefully to activities such as interviewing for new staff appointments and improving the school environment.

Pupils play a significant role in the local community through activities they undertake as part of the Welsh Baccalaureate Qualification, involvement in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme and extensive participation in a variety of volunteering and charity fund-raising events.  Through these, as well as a range of other activities, pupils acquire the skills necessary for life and work outside school.

Key Question 2:  How good is provision?

Good

Learning experiences:  Good

The range of subjects offered at key stage 3, key stage 4 and the sixth form meet statutory requirements, including the Learning and Skills Measure.  However, carousel arrangements and split teaching groups in a small minority of subjects at key stage 3 and key stage 4 do not always contribute to cohesive and progressive learning experiences for a minority of pupils.

At key stage 4, the school offers a broad range of academic and vocational options through well-managed collaboration with other providers.  This has increased the range of level 2 vocational courses and improved outcomes, for example in raising the level 2 threshold.  All pupils in the sixth form benefit from the highly-effective organisation and management of the curriculum and especially the Welsh Baccalaureate.

The school offers a broad range of extra-curricular activities and educational visits.

Provision to develop pupils’ skills varies too much.  All pupils in Year 9 and Year 10 have the opportunity to achieve Essential Skills Wales qualifications.  However, arrangements to co-ordinate and track skills provision are at an early stage.

Welsh language provision is adequate.  The Welsh dimension features in subjects other than Welsh, but this is not developed consistently across all areas of the school’s work.

The school has an extremely strong track record in provision for sustainable development and global citizenship.  It promotes its good practice locally and through wider networks.  Pupils benefit from regular participation in a wide range of awareness and fund-raising projects, including a local regeneration project that encourages pupil engagement with conservation and sustainability.  The school is one of the few secondary schools in Wales to be awarded the Eco Schools Platinum Award.

Teaching:  Adequate

In most lessons, teachers use their extensive subject knowledge well.  They foster positive working relationships that help to engage and enthuse pupils.  Most teachers use thoughtful questioning that encourages pupils to think carefully and extends their understanding.

In a few lessons, stimulating and particularly challenging time-specific tasks as well as teachers’ probing questioning contribute to very effective learning.  In the majority of lessons, teachers set clear objectives, plan a suitable range of learning activities and provide helpful stimulus materials that enable pupils to make good progress.  Teachers frequently draw useful links to prior learning or topical issues and events to reinforce pupils’ understanding.  In many lessons, pupils have good opportunities to work in pairs or small groups to solve problems, support each other and develop their communication skills.

However, in a minority of classes, pupils do not make enough progress.  This is because:

  • teachers do not have high enough expectations or set suitably challenging tasks, particularly for more able pupils;
  • the pace of the lesson is too slow, pupils do not have enough time to complete tasks and learning objectives are not achieved; or
  • pupils do not have enough opportunities to be independent learners.

The school has developed a comprehensive and clear system for tracking and monitoring pupils’ progress.  This data is generally used well by senior leaders to set challenging targets for individual pupils and groups.

Verbal feedback to pupils in lessons is good overall and helps pupils understand how to improve their work.  The quality of written feedback is more varied.  Teachers mark pupils’ work regularly.  However, too often pupils are not provided with clear, specific information about the standards they are reaching and how to improve.

Reports to parents are informative and indicate the progress pupils are making.  They do not always indicate clearly enough how pupils can improve further.

Care, support and guidance:  Good

The school provides a high level of care for pupils.  The very effective arrangements that support and contribute to pupils’ health, wellbeing and learning have a positive impact on behaviour and attendance.

The school helps pupils well to adopt healthy lifestyles.  Subjects such as physical education, personal and social education, science and home economics contribute to pupils’ understanding of healthy living.  Pupils’ participation in extra-curricular activities, the Healthy Schools’ Awards and the School Nutrition Action Group further promote healthy living and the benefits of a healthy diet.

Learning experiences promote pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development well.  The pastoral framework of weekly and daily themes, and aspects covered in religious studies lessons, provide valuable opportunities for pupils to reflect on their own and other people’s lives and beliefs and consider important moral and topical issues.

The school has good access to specialist services, and works with a range of partners and agencies to provide guidance and advice and to support individual pupils’ wellbeing.  Provision of information and advice is effective and enables pupils to make well-informed choices about the courses they follow at key stage 4 and  post-16.

Provision for pupils with additional learning needs is effective and enables them to progress well with their learning.  There is a helpful system to assess pupils’ needs prior to or on entry to the school.  This enables those with additional learning needs to participate fully in the curriculum and school life and achieve good outcomes.  Individual education plans are comprehensive, set suitable targets and are reviewed regularly.  Parents are kept well informed and are fully involved in their child’s education.

There are appropriate policies and arrangements for safeguarding that meet requirements and give no cause for concern.

Learning environment:  Good

The school is an inclusive community where everyone is encouraged to make the best of their ability.  An ethos of tolerance, based firmly on mutual respect and appreciation of diversity, pervades the school.

All pupils have equal access to the curriculum.  Facilities for those with mobility difficulties are particularly good.

Overall, the accommodation meets the needs of pupils well.  The learning resource centre is of particularly high-quality.  The school buildings and grounds are well maintained and the landscaping of the site greatly enhances the learning environment.

Stimulating displays around the school celebrate pupils’ work and achievements.  Learning resources meet pupils’ needs well.  The provision and use of information and communication technology equipment across the school are particularly good.

Key Question 3:  How good are leadership and management?

Good

Leadership:  Good

The headteacher, ably supported by members of the senior leadership team, provides firm and effective strategic leadership.  The leadership team shares a clear vision and promotes high expectations that place the needs of pupils at the forefront of their responsibilities.

Management roles ensure that members of the senior leadership team have a balanced and complementary range of responsibilities.  The recent redefinition of staff roles and responsibilities has ensured a sharper focus on the quality of teaching, learning and assessment.  There is greater emphasis on using data to set suitable targets and to monitor outcomes.  This is providing greater challenge for staff and pupils, and increasing accountability.  These initiatives are having a significant impact on improving pupil outcomes.

School policies and procedures take appropriate account of national and local priorities and are reviewed and updated regularly.  Senior leadership team meetings and meetings for middle managers provide suitable opportunities to discuss improvement initiatives and plan further work.  There are appropriate performance management arrangements that offer both challenge and support, and identify relevant staff development needs.

Overall, middle managers carry out their roles effectively.  The majority use data well to monitor performance.  However, there is inconsistency in the extent to which middle managers have implemented particular improvement strategies, such as ensuring greater consistency in the quality of marking.

The governing body has a good understanding of the challenges the school faces and its key priorities.  Governors are well informed about the school’s performance and have a secure appreciation of its strengths and areas for development.  Governors offer effective support and constructive challenge to the school, where appropriate.

Improving quality:  Adequate

Senior leaders have a clear understanding of the school’s strengths and key priorities for improvement.  Self-evaluation arrangements include the rigorous analysis of data and a programme of regular lesson observations.  These procedures identify relevant priorities for improvement, which are identified clearly in the school’s self-evaluation report.

Departmental reports vary in quality.  The majority make realistic judgements about pupils’ performance, but a minority of reports do not provide a sufficiently robust evaluation.  In all cases, there is not enough use of the findings of lesson observations, scrutiny of pupils’ work and the views of learners to support judgements on standards and provision.

The school development plan provides a good basis for improvement.  It links directly to the outcomes of self-evaluation.  Priorities focus appropriately on raising standards, improving teaching and learning, and improving literacy and numeracy.  The plan sets out a range of appropriate actions, responsibilities and suitable success criteria.

Departmental plans address appropriately whole-school priorities.  A minority set out a range of actions and include clear, measurable improvement targets.  However, the majority of plans lack rigour and focus.  These plans do not include useful actions for improvement or specific success criteria.

Continuous professional development arrangements are appropriately linked to whole-school improvement priorities.  All staff are involved in working groups within the school, and a number with external partners.  Most of these groups are at an early stage of development.  Peer observations have helped promote good practice across the school.

The school has made good progress in addressing three of the recommendations from the previous inspection.  Standards have improved at all key stages, and the school offers a wider range of courses at key stage 4 and a more balanced curriculum at key stage 3.  There have also been significant improvements in the quality of accommodation and resources.  However, the school has not made enough progress in improving the quality of teaching and assessment and strengthening self-evaluation and improvement-planning arrangements.

Partnership working:  Good

The school works effectively with a broad range of partners to enhance the quality of pupils’ learning experiences and improve their wellbeing.

Links with parents are good.  Through a range of communication channels such as the school website, online portal, twitter, newsletters and a parents’ forum, parents are appropriately informed about developments within the school and the performance of pupils.  Parents’ concerns are addressed promptly and effectively.

Partnerships with primary schools contribute to effective transition arrangements, and to continuity and progression in pupils’ learning experiences.  The school works closely with other Powys secondary schools and schools within the ‘family’ to promote best practice and enhance learning resources.

The school works well in the South Powys 14-19 network to extend the range of academic and vocational courses for pupils in key stage 4 and the sixth form.  There are robust arrangements to monitor the quality of provision for pupils on collaborative programmes.

Extensive working partnerships with external agencies such as Coleg Powys, Careers Wales, the police, fire service and youth services provide specialist provision to help meet the needs of pupils.

The school has a number of partnerships with a range of community and voluntary groups that make a significant contribution to promoting pupils’ wellbeing, and social and life skills.  The ‘Friends of Crickhowell High School’ help to raise the school’s profile within the community and raise funds for specific projects.

Resource management:  Good

Overall, the school manages its resources well.  It has a sufficient number of  well-qualified staff to teach the curriculum, although they are not always deployed in their specialist areas.  Appropriate support is provided for those who teach a subject other than their specialism.  An effective team of learning support assistants is deployed well to support teachers in their work with pupils.

The business manager co-ordinates the financial management of the school effectively.  He ensures that the school takes good account of audit recommendations and complies with financial regulations.  The governing body has a good overview of the school budget and ensures that strategic objectives are funded appropriately.  It works well with the senior leadership team to identify additional funding to improve the quality of accommodation and resources.

Because of the effective management of resources and the good pupil outcomes, the school provides good value for money.

Appendix 1

Commentary on performance data

At key stage 4, the proportion of pupils attaining the level 2 threshold including English and mathematics has improved steadily since 2008 although it has been below the family average throughout this period.  When compared with similar schools based on the proportion of pupils entitled to free school meals, performance has placed the school in the top half in each of the last four years.  In 2011, performance was in line with modelled expectations.  The proportion of pupils attaining the core subject indicator shows a steady pattern of improvement between 2007 and 2010 but performance dipped significantly in 2011.  Unverified data for 2012 shows a further rise in the proportion of pupils attaining the level 2 threshold including English and mathematics and an improvement in the core subject indicator.

Performance in the level 2 threshold improved significantly in 2011and was above the family average having been below it for the previous four years.  Performance in the capped points score was below the family average.  Unverified data for 2012 shows a further rise in both the level 2 threshold and capped points score.

Performance in the level 1 threshold has been uneven over the last five years.  In 2011, it was below the family average and placed the school in the bottom quarter when compared with similar schools in terms of free-school-meal benchmarks.  Unverified data for 2012 shows an improvement in the level 1 threshold.

Over the last three years, performance in English and mathematics has placed the school in the top half of similar schools in terms of free-school-meal benchmarks, but has been generally below family averages in this period.  Unverified data for 2012 shows further improvements in these subjects.  However, performance in science has been well below similar schools’ averages in the last three years.

In 2011, no pupil left the school without a qualification.  The proportion staying on in full-time education after 16 is high.  Very few pupils who left school at 16 are reported as being not in education, employment and training and this proportion is much better than local authority and Wales averages.

At key stage 3, performance in the core subject indicator improved in 2012, maintaining a steady improvement of eight percentage points over the last four years.  In 2012, performance was above the family average for the first time in four years.  When compared with similar schools based on free-school-meal benchmarks, the school has been in the top half in each of the last four years.  When compared with modelled expectations, performance in 2012 was above that to be expected.

In English, performance has improved steadily over the last four years.  In 2012, performance was in line with the family average.  When compared with that of similar schools based on the proportion of pupils entitled to free school meals, performance has been in the top half in each of the last four years.  Performance in English at level 6 and above improved in 2012, but has been below the family average in each of the last four years.

Mathematics performance has improved steadily over the last four years.  In 2012, performance was above the family average.  When compared with that of similar schools based on the proportion of pupils entitled to free school meals, performance has been in the top half in each of the last four years.  At level 6 and above, performance in mathematics has improved over the last four years, but has been below the family average throughout this period.

Performance in science has been uneven although it improved in 2012.  In 2012, performance was in line with the family average.  When compared with that of similar schools based on the proportion of pupils entitled to free school meals, performance has been in the top half in each of the last four years.

In the sixth form, students perform above the Wales averages for the level 3 threshold and for the wider points score.  In 2011, performance was above the family average for the wider points score, but below the family average for the level 3 threshold.  Just over half of all A level entries were awarded the highest A*/A grades in 2011.  All students achieved the Welsh Baccalaureate.

At key stage 3 in the core subject indicator, the gap between the performance of girls and boys was larger than the Wales average in 2012.  However, in the previous two years boys had performed better than girls.  At key stage 4 in 2011, the gap between the performance of boys and girls was smaller than family and Wales averages in most indicators.  This is mainly because boys perform better relative to family averages than girls.

Very few pupils receive free school meals, and therefore it is not possible to identify trends and patterns in this group of pupils.

Appendix 2

Stakeholder satisfaction report

Responses to parent questionnaires

Estyn received 68 responses to the parent questionnaire.  Of those that responded, many parents gave a positive or very positive response to all questions.  Overall, parents’ responses were slightly less positive than national benchmarks.

Many parents are satisfied with the school and believe that it is well run.  Almost all parents indicate that their children are safe and like the school, and state that their children were helped to settle in well when they started school.  Many consider that there is a good range of extra-curricular activities and trips, and say that their children are encouraged to be healthy.

Most parents believe that their children are making good progress, that teaching is good, and that staff expect their children to work hard and do their best.  Many say that homework reinforces learning.  Most parents indicate that staff support their children well.  Most feel that their children are well prepared for moving on to the next school or college or work.

Many parents feel well informed about their children’s progress.  They feel comfortable about approaching the school to discuss matters about their child’s education and wellbeing.  Most believe that pupils behave well in school and that staff treat all children fairly and with respect.

Responses to learner questionnaires 

Estyn received responses from 181 learners, selected at random from across the age range.  In many cases, learners’ responses are more positive than national benchmarks.

Nearly all learners state that they feel safe in school.  Most indicate that they have someone to turn to if they have any concerns and many believe that the school deals well with bullying.

Almost all learners consider that they are doing well, are encouraged to take responsibility and feel well prepared for further education or employment.  Most say that staff help them to learn and make progress, while many say that homework helps them to understand and improve their work.  Nearly all learners believe that they have enough books and equipment.

Most learners state that the school teaches them to be healthy and that there are plenty of opportunities to get regular exercise.

Many learners confirm that staff treat them fairly and with respect while nearly all indicate that the school helps them to understand and respect people from other

backgrounds.  Many learners feel the school takes account of their views.  Many learners say that pupils behave well.

Appendix 3

The inspection team

John Thomas Reporting Inspector
Steve Davies Team Inspector
Gareth Wyn Jones Team Inspector
Denise Whiting-Wade Team Inspector
Andrew Herdman Team Inspector
Edward Tipper Lay Inspector
Maria Rimmer Peer Inspector
Sally Dawkins

School Nominee

Copies of the report

Copies of this report are available from the school and from the Estyn website (www.estyn.gov.uk)

Under the Independent School Standards (Wales) Regulations 2003, the school must provide copies of the report to all parents of the school.  Where a pupil is subject to placement by a local authority, a copy of the report should be sent by the school to each relevant authority.

Year groups and key stages

Schools use a common system of numbering year groups from the start of compulsory schooling to 18 years of age.  This system emphasises the importance of continuity and eases communication among schools, governing bodies, parents and LEAs.

The term ‘Reception’ (FPR) refers to the year group of pupils in a primary school who reach the age of five during the academic year.  FPYear 1 refers to the year group of pupils who reach the age of six during the academic year and so on.  Year 13 is the year group of students who reach the age of 18 during the academic year.

Primary phase:

Year FPR FPY1 FPY2 Y3 Y4 Y5 Y6
Ages 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11

Secondary phase:

Year Y7 Y8 Y9 Y10 Y11 Y12 Y13
Ages 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17 17-18

The four key stages cover the following year groups:

Foundation Phase Reception, Year 1 and Year 2
Key stage 2 Year 3 to Year 6
Key stage 3 Year 7 to Year 9
Key stage 4 Year 10 and Year 11

Glossary of terms

Core subject indicator (CSI) This relates to the expected performance in English or Welsh, mathematics and science, the core subjects of the National Curriculum.
Families of schools These have been created to enable schools to compare their performance to that of similar schools across Wales.  Families include schools with similar proportions of pupils entitled to free school meals, living in 20% most deprived areas of Wales, having special education needs at school action plus or statemented and with English as an additional language acquisition less than competent.
Level 1 This represents the equivalent of a GCSE at grade D to G.
Level 1 threshold This represents a volume of learning equivalent to five GCSEs at grade D to G.
Level 2 This represents the equivalent of a GCSE at grade A* to C.
Level 2 threshold including English or Welsh first language and mathematics This represents a volume of learning equivalent to five GCSEs at grade A* to C including English or Welsh first language and mathematics.
Level 2 threshold This represents a volume of learning equivalent to five GCSEs at grade A* to C.
Level 3 This represents the equivalent of an A level at grade A*-E.
Level 3 threshold This represents a volume of learning equivalent to two A levels at grade A* to E.
Average wider points score This includes all qualifications approved for use in Wales at the relevant age, for example at the age of 16 or at the age of 18.
Capped wider points score This includes the best eight results from all qualifications approved for use in Wales at the age of 16.
All-Wales Core Data sets Schools and local authorities may refer to performance relative to their family of schools.  These families of schools have been created to enable schools to compare their performance to that of similar schools across Wales.  Families include schools with similar proportions of pupils entitled to free school meals, living in 20% most deprived areas of Wales, having special education needs at school action plus or statemented and with English as an additional language acquisition less than competent.