Science & Technology

Vision Statement:

Our vision is that learning about Science and Technology together will inspire our young people to be confident scientists, skilled critical thinkers, problem-solvers, collaborators, designers and innovators. Through real-world and practical application, and an understanding of how our world works, learners will ignite their creativity and imagination bringing value and contributing to society. Our learners are encouraged to take initiative and nurture their passion for all aspects of Science and Technology, allowing them access to an exciting, challenging plethora of opportunities in the field of Science and Technology.

AOLE Staff:

Dr Geraint Williams: Director of Learning and Achievement SciTech
Ms Anita Burbridge: Deputy Director of Learning and Achievement SciTech
Mrs Kelly Turnbull: Deputy Director of Learning and Achievement SciTech
Mr Grant Elliot: Computer Science/ Digital Skills
Mr Alan Lewis: Computer Science/Assistant Headteacher
Mr Joseph Mulholland: Biology and Science
Mrs Rachel Ough-Jones: Chemistry and Science
Mr Jack Holland: Chemistry and Science
Miss Lucy Hoskin: Physics and Science
Miss Victoria Maguire: Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Science
Dr Wyn Howells: Science Technician

The Curriculum:

KS3 YEAR 7

 

SciTech AoLE

Our ‘new’ SciTech curriculum looks at a wide range of fascinating science and integrates effectively with DT and Computer Science to allow students to gain a broad understanding of the fascinating and valuable subjects within the AoLE.

Science

All student will first complete a unit to titled ‘Beginning be a Scientist’ which covers laboratory safety, practical equipment and practical skills and looks at the scientific method and what it means to be a scientist.

The remaining units covered in Science lessons are taught on a rotation to ensure the availability of specialist experimental equipment. These units are:-

‘Cells and Microscopes’

which looks at cell theory, different forms of cells, DNA and the use of the microscope.

‘Solar System’

which looks at space in the context of our Solar System and looks at some of the astounding phenomena that are caused by the movement of the planets and the sun through space.

‘Food and Digestion’

which looks at what makes a meal healthy and how our bodies are adapted to allow us to breakdown and use the products of digestion.

‘Acids and Alkalis’

which is a practical heavy unit that looks at acids and alkalis in the context of the pH scale and looks at what these chemicals are used for.

‘Dinosaurs’

which through the medium of dinosaurs looks at the vastness of geological time, how organisms adapt to their environment and how organisms evolve over time.

‘Oceans’

which looks at the oceans which cover approximately 71% of the planet, the damage humans are causing and what we can do to protect this vital resource.

Integration with DT and Computer Science

All of the year 7 classes will have covered the Science unit ‘Solar System’ by the February half term. Subsequently year 7 classes will be taught in their Computer Science lessons a ‘Lego Robotics’ unit which will provide them with the skills to build and programme Lego robots. This learning will then provide the basis for a six week ‘Mars Rover’ project carried out in the classes DT lessons to design and build a model Mars rover based on the Lego robots.

KS3 YEAR 8

 

Science

The units covered in Science lessons are taught on a rotation to ensure the availability of specialist experimental equipment. These units are:-

  • ‘Environment’
  • ‘The Brain’
  • ‘Atoms, Elements and Compounds’
  • ‘Microbes’
  • ‘Inventions and Circuits’
  • ‘Forces and Heat’

 

KS4 YEARS 9-11

 

YEAR 9:

Skills building, preparation for GCSE.

YEARS 9 -11

Students have 2 lessons per week for each subject except Double Award Science which has 4 lessons per week. The Faculty offers six GCSE courses:

  • GCSE Biology (WJEC)
  • GCSE Chemistry (WJEC)
  • GCSE Computer Science (WJEC)
  • GCSE Digital Technology (WJEC)
  • GCSE Double Science (WJEC)
  • GCSE Physics (WJEC)

 

GCSE Biology – Summary of Assessment:

This WJEC GCSE Biology specification provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, science and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society.
Studying GCSE Biology provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Scientific understanding is changing our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all learners should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They should be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application.

Unit 1: CELLS, ORGAN SYSTEMS and ECOSYSTEMS Written examination : 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 2: VARIATION, HOMEOSTASIS and MICRO-ORGANISMS Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 3: PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT
10% of qualification 30 marks
Practical assessment that will be carried out in centres, but will be externally marked by WJEC. It will take place in the first half of the spring term (January – February). It is recommended that this should be in the final year of study. An untiered assessment

 

GCSE Chemistry – Summary of Assessment:

This WJEC GCSE Chemistry specification provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, science and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society.
Studying GCSE Chemistry provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Scientific understanding is changing our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all learners should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They should be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application.

Unit 1: CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES, REACTIONS and ESSENTIAL RESOURCES
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 2: CHEMICAL BONDING, APPLICATION OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS and ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 3: PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT
10% of qualification 30 marks
Practical assessment that will be carried out in centres, but will be externally marked by WJEC. It will take place in the first half of the spring term (January – February). It is recommended that this should be in the final year of study. An untiered assessment.

 

GCSE Computer Science – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC GCSE in Computer Science encourages learners to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including; abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs to do so
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society
  • apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science.

Computers are widely used in all aspects of business, industry, government, education, leisure and the home. In this technological age, a study of computer science, and particularly how computers are used in the solution of a variety of problems, is essential to learners.

Computer science integrates well with subjects across the curriculum. It demands both logical discipline and imaginative creativity in the selection and design of algorithms and the writing, testing and debugging of programs; it relies on an understanding of the rules of language at a fundamental level; it encourages an awareness of the management and organisation of computer systems; it extends learners’ horizons beyond the school or college environment in the appreciation of the effects of computer science on society and individuals.
The WJEC GCSE in Computer Science has been designed to give an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computer science and a broad scope of study opportunities. This specification has been designed to free centres to concentrate on innovative delivery of the course by having a streamlined, uncomplicated, future- proof structure, with realistic technological requirements.

This specification also gives learners an opportunity to produce extended written responses and demonstrate the quality of their written communication, including appropriate use of punctuation and grammar.

 

Unit 1: Understanding Computer Science Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes 50% of the qualification
100 marks
This unit investigates hardware, logical operations, communication, data representation and data types, operating systems, principles of programming, software engineering, program construction, security and data management and the impacts of digital technology on wider society.
Unit 2: Computational Thinking and Programming On-screen examination: 2 hours
30% of the qualification
60 marks
This unit investigates problem solving, algorithms and programming constructs, programming languages, data structures and data types and security and authentication.
Unit 3: Software Development
Non-exam assessment: 20 hours 20% of qualification
80 marks
This unit requires learners to produce a programmed solution to a problem. They must analyse the problem, design a solution to the problem, develop a final programmed solution, test the solution and give suggestions for further development of the solution. Throughout the production of the solution learners are required to produce a refinement log that evidences the development of the solution

 

GCSE ICT – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC GCSE qualification in Digital Technology is a broad-based qualification that allows learners to build on the digital skills, knowledge and understanding that is used both in their school and everyday lives. The qualification is designed for learners who wish to begin their journey towards a career that utilises digital technologies or to progress onto advanced level programmes of learning involving digital technologies. The qualification will allow learners to develop their understanding of the range of digital technology systems at use in our connected and globalised society. It will also allow learners to explore the ever-evolving nature of digital technology systems and how these systems can be used productively, creatively and safely. This WJEC GCSE specification in Digital Technology will enable learners to:

• become independent, confident and knowledgeable users of existing, new and emerging digital technologies

• develop knowledge of different digital technology systems used across a range of occupational sectors

• understand the impact digital technologies can have on individuals and wider society and the ways in which they can bring about change

• develop skills in organising and analysing data to identify trends and audiences

• become creators of digital products, in a variety of formats and for a variety of purposes, that meet specified, authentic needs

• develop transferable skills in using a range of hardware and software

• develop their understanding of the systems development life cycle and of how ideas can become products.

 

Unit 1: The digital world
On-screen examination: 1 hour 30 minutes 40% of qualification
80 marks
An assessment (taken on-screen), comprising of a range of question types to assess specification content related to digital technology systems, the value of digital technology and perspectives on digital technology.
All questions are compulsory.
Unit 2: Digital practices
Non-exam assessment (NEA): 45 hours 40% of qualification
80 marks
A non-examined assessment comprising of two sections. In Section A candidates will interrogate a supplied data set imported into a spreadsheet in order to inform Section B, where they will create a website incorporating either an animation or a game related to a set context.
Unit 3: Communicating in the digital world Non-exam assessment (NEA): 15 hours 20% of qualification
60 marks
A non-examined assessment focusing on marketing digital assets using social media. Candidates will create digital assets related to a set context and then formulate an online digital communications campaign around them.

 

GCSE Double Award Science – Summary of Assessment:

This WJEC GCSE Science (Double Award) specification provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, science and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society.

Studying GCSE Science (Double Award) provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Scientific understanding is changing our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all learners should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They should be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application.

 

Unit 1: (Double Award) BIOLOGY 1
Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 2: (Double Award) CHEMISTRY 1
 Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks/td>
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 3: (Double Award) PHYSICS 1
 Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 4: (Double Award) BIOLOGY 2
 Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 5: (Double Award) CHEMISTRY 2
 Written examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 6: (Double Award) PHYSICS 2
Written Examination: 1 hour 15 minutes
15% of qualification 60 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 7: (Double Award) PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT
10% of qualification 60 marks
Practical assessment that will be carried out in centres, but will be externally marked by WJEC. It will take place in the first half of the spring term (January – February). It is recommended that this should be in the final year of study. An untiered assessment.

 

GCSE Physics – Summary of Assessment:

This WJEC GCSE Physics specification provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, science and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society.
Studying GCSE Physics provides the foundations for understanding the material world. Scientific understanding is changing our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all learners should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. They should be helped to appreciate how the complex and diverse phenomena of the natural world can be described in terms of a small number of key ideas relating to the sciences which are both inter-linked, and are of universal application.

Unit 1: ELECTRICITY, ENERGY and WAVES
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 2: FORCES, SPACE and RADIOACTIVITY 
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes
45% of qualification 80 marks
A mix of short answer questions, structured questions, extended writing and data response questions with some set in a practical context. A tiered assessment.
Unit 3: PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT
10% of qualification 30 marks
Practical assessment that will be carried out in centres, but will be externally marked by WJEC. It will take place in the first half of the spring term (January – February). It is recommended that this should be in the final year of study. An untiered assessment.

 

KS5

Year 12 and 13 students have 4 lessons per week. The Faculty offers five A Level courses:

  • GCE Biology (WJEC)
  • GCE Chemistry (WJEC)
  • GCE Computer Science (WJEC)
  • GCE ICT (OCR Cambridge Technical)
  • GCE Physics (WJEC)

 

GCE Biology – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC A level in Biology provides a wide breadth of knowledge which touches on many varied aspects of a range of topics. These include the internal workings of organisms in physiology and the interdependence of living things in ecology, to social issues including human influence on the environment and the ethical considerations of genetics. The study of biology encourages an appreciation of these issues and their implications as well as providing an insight into the living world. The inclusion of optional topics allows learners to gain a deeper insight into a wider range of biological topics. It is intended that the use of a variety of approaches will stimulate interest, promote understanding and engender an overall appreciation and sense of wonder at the living world. This specification promotes an understanding of scientific method as the means to increase scientific knowledge and develop an enquiring and critical approach. Learners will develop an awareness that different perceptions, predictions and interpretations may be applied according to context. Practical work is an intrinsic part of biology, and is greatly valued by higher education. It is imperative that practical skills are developed throughout this course and that an investigative approach is promoted. The WJEC A level in Biology aims to encourage learners to:

• develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of biology and how they relate to each other

• develop and demonstrate a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods used within biology

• develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills

• develop their interest in and enthusiasm for biology, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject

• understand how society makes decisions about biological issues and how biology contributes to the success of the economy and society.

 

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1
Basic Biochemistry and Cell Organisation
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
20% of qualification
A range of short and longer structured questions and one extended response.
AS Unit 2
Biodiversity and Physiology of Body Systems
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
20% of qualification
A range of short and longer structured questions and one extended response.

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3
Energy, Homeostasis and the Environment Written examination: 2 hours (90 marks)
25% of qualification
A range of short and longer structured questions and one extended response.
A2 Unit 4
Variation, Inheritance and Options Written examination: 2 hours (90 marks)
25% of qualification
Section A: 70 marks
A range of short and longer structured questions and one extended response.
Section B: 20 marks
Choice of one option out of three:
Immunology and Disease, Human Musculoskeletal Anatomy or
Neurobiology and Behaviour
A2 Unit 5
Practical examination (50 marks)
10% of qualification
This unit comprises two tasks:
Experimental Task (20 marks)
Practical Analysis Task (30 marks)
GCE Chemistry – Summary of Assessment:

 

GCE Chemistry – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC A level in Chemistry provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, chemistry and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society. Studying this A level in Chemistry encourages learners to:

• develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other

• develop and demonstrate a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods

• develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills

• develop their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject

• understand how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society. The specification lends itself to a variety of teaching and learning styles and offers learners of all abilities an enjoyable and positive learning experience. Practical work is an intrinsic part of chemistry, and is greatly valued by higher education. It is imperative that practical skills are developed throughout the course and that an investigative approach is promoted wherever possible.

 

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1
The Language of Chemistry, Structure of Matter and Simple Reactions
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
20% of qualification
A range of short answer, structured and extended response questions.
AS Unit 2
Energy, Rate and Chemistry of Carbon Compounds
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
20% of qualification
A range of short answer, structured and extended response questions.

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3
Physical and Inorganic Chemistry
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes (80 marks)
25% of qualification
A range of short answer, structured and extended response questions.
A2 Unit 4
Organic Chemistry and Analysis
Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes (80 marks)
25% of qualification
A range of short answer, structured and extended response questions.
A2 Unit 5
Practical (60 marks)
10% of qualification
This unit comprises two tasks:
Experimental Task (30 marks)
Practical Methods and Analysis Task (30 marks)

 

GCE Computer Science – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC AS and A Level in Computer Science encourages learners to develop:

• an understanding of, and the ability to apply, the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation

• the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including writing programs to do so

• the capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically

• the capacity to see relationships between different aspects of computer science

• mathematical skills – see Appendix C

• the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

Computers are widely used in all aspects of business, industry, government, education, leisure and the home. In this increasingly technological age, a study of computer science, and particularly how computers are used in the solution of a variety of problems, is not only valuable to the learners but also essential to the future well-being of the country. Computer science integrates well with subjects across the curriculum. It demands both logical discipline and imaginative creativity in the selection and design of algorithms and the writing, testing and debugging of programs; it relies on an understanding of the rules of language at a fundamental level; it encourages an awareness of the management and organisation of computer systems; it extends the learners’ horizons beyond the school or college environment in the appreciation of the effects of computer science on society and individuals. For these reasons, computer science is as relevant to a learner studying arts subjects as it is to one studying science subjects. The WJEC AS and A Level in Computer Science has been designed to give an indepth understanding of the fundamental concepts of computer science and a broad scope of study opportunities. This specification has been designed to free centres to concentrate on innovative delivery of the course by having a streamlined, uncomplicated, future-proof structure, with realistic technological requirements.

 

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1
Fundamentals of Computer Science Written examination: 2 hours
25% of qualification
100 marks
This unit investigates computer architecture, communication, data representation, data structures, software applications, programs, algorithms, logic, programming methodologies and the impact of computer science on society.
AS Unit 2
Practical Programming to Solve Problems
On-screen examination: 2 hours
15% of qualification
60 marks/td>
This unit consists of a series of set tasks completed on-screen by candidates. These tasks will assess the practical application of knowledge and understanding and will require the use of Visual Basic.NET, Python or Java as a programming language.

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3
Programming and System Development Written examination: 2 hours
20% of qualification
100 marks
This unit investigates programs, data structures, algorithms, logic, programming methodologies and the impact of computer science on society.
A2 Unit 4
Computer Architecture, Data, Communication and Applications Written examination: 2 hours
20% of qualification
100 marks
This unit investigates computer architecture, communication, data representation, organisation and structure of data, programs, algorithms and software applications.
A2 Unit 5
Programmed Solution to a Problem
Non-exam assessment
20% of qualification
100 marks
Candidates discuss, investigate, design, prototype, refine and implement, test and evaluate a computerised solution to a problem chosen by the candidate which must be solved using original code (programming).
This is a substantial piece of work, undertaken over an extended period of time.

 

GCE Physics – Summary of Assessment:

The WJEC A level in Physics provides a broad, coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It encourages learners to develop confidence in, and a positive attitude towards, physics and to recognise its importance in their own lives and to society. Studying this A level in Physics encourages learners to:

• develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of the subject and how they relate to each other

• develop and demonstrate a deep appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of scientific methods

• develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills

• develop their interest in and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject

• understand how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society.

This specification is intended to promote a variety of styles of teaching and learning so that the course is enjoyable for all participants. Learners will be introduced to a wide range of physics principles which will allow them to enjoy a positive learning experience whilst gaining an understanding of how nature operates at both microscopic and macroscopic scales. The optional topics have been developed to allow learners to gain an insight into topics in the world of work which use physics on a daily basis. Practical work is an intrinsic part of physics, and is highly valued by higher education. It is imperative that practical skills are developed throughout this course and that an investigatory approach is promoted.

 

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1
Motion, Energy and Matter
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks)
20% of qualification
A mix of short answer and extended answer structured questions with some set in a practical context.
AS Unit 2
Electricity and Light
Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks) 20% of qualification
A mix of short answer and extended answer structured questions with some set in a practical context.

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3
Oscillations and Nuclei
Written examination: 2 hours 15 minutes (100 marks) 25% of qualification
Section A: 80 marks
A mix of short answer and extended answer questions with some set in a practical context.
Section B: 20 marks – one comprehension question.
A2 Unit 4
Fields and Options
Written examination: 2 hours (100 marks)
25% of qualification
Section A: 80 marks
A mix of short answer and extended answer questions with some set in a practical context.
Section B: 20 marks – choice of 1 out of 4 options: Alternating Currents, Medical Physics, The Physics of Sports, Energy and the Environment.
A2 Unit 5
Practical examination (50 marks)
10% of qualification
This unit comprises two tasks.
Experimental Task (25 marks) Practical Analysis Task (25 marks)

 

Cambridge Technicals in IT

Cambridge Technicals in IT allows students to gain an insight into IT with a wide range of units that provide students with practical and project-based opportunities to develop knowledge and skills.

  • 6 units of coursework across both AS and A2
  • 100% internally assessed content
  • Student focused internal assessment rules
  • OCR visiting moderation providing centre feedback and support
  • Attracts UCAS tariff points

 

Unit TitleAim of Unit
Unit 1
ASCommunication is a vital skill for any individual. The effective use of communication and flexibility of styles is a highly desirable attribute to employers to maintain good working practice. This unit identifies the principles for effective communication and introduces learners to the interpersonal skills and attributes required within a workplace and how different combinations and approaches are required for a range of job roles it also identifies the different IT tools available for safe and secure communication and exchange of information within an organisation. Learners will consider approaches and adapt the way they communicate, depending on their audience. This unit will prepare learners to effectively use various communication channels, within a working environment and to understand what an employer expects of an individual and how to communicate effectively whilst developing their own personal development needs.
Unit 2ASCommunication is a vital skill for any individual. The effective use of communication and flexibility of styles is a highly desirable attribute to employers to maintain good working practice. This unit identifies the principles for effective communication and introduces learners to the interpersonal skills and attributes required within a workplace and how different combinations and approaches are required for a range of job roles it also identifies the different IT tools available for safe and secure communication and exchange of information within an organisation. Learners will consider approaches and adapt the way they communicate, depending on their audience. This unit will prepare learners to effectively use various communication channels, within a working environment and to understand what an employer expects of an individual and how to communicate effectively whilst developing their own personal development needs.
Unit 3ASThe computer games industry is a rapidly expanding one which adapts with each new technology that emerges. Games are developed across a range of platforms, for differing audiences and of differing complexity. The look, feel and purpose of games is so varied that the repurposing and multi-purpose/platform becomes a consideration for designers. This unit gives learners the opportunity to consider the new and exciting developments within the games industry with the rapid advancements of the technologies available to developers. This unit introduces learners to the creativity of the games industry, allowing them to explore the industry, the impact on society and the position within the marketplace for a game based on its genre and purpose. The learner will design and develop a game to an identified specification, using the appropriate programming techniques. Once completed the learner will be expected to full test their computer game against the specification and for functionality to ensure that it is suitable to be given to the target audience. They should also create the technical documentation to support their development. This unit allows learners to understand about different computer games, to be able to understand the social impact of computer games and enables them to design, develop and test computer games. This unit will give a good insight into working within the computer gaming industry.
Unit 4 A2Businesses require employees to have some knowledge of project planning. This unit will provide the learner with the skills required to plan and run a project of their own. It is recommended that learners may choose to develop a plan for a practical project they intend to run or to achieve other related units within the qualification. The aim of this unit is to help the learner understand how projects are managed and to be able to plan a project using IT. Learners will learn how to follow the project plan and review the process that they have followed.
Unit 5 A2Nearly all businesses and organisations realise the importance of having a web presence in the 21st century. It provides an opportunity to reach an international audience with their product or brand. Websites need to be well designed to keep visitors returning and avoid excluding user groups by being inaccessible. Companies need to analyse the technical considerations to ensure they do not hinder the user experience. This unit will prepare learners to design, create and test a fully functioning website, while also providing essential grounding knowledge on the architecture, design and security issues that need to be considered.
Unit 6 A2This unit will allow learners to understand the different types of animation that are designed and created in industry for different mediums. They will learn about the possible uses in the media, gaming, on the web and on mobile phone applications. They will gain the knowledge and skills to use software to design and create different types of animation. Computer animation is the method used to generate animated images using computer graphics. The more general term computer generated imagery (CGI) encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only refers to moving images. Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics, although 2D computer graphics are still widely used for a wide range of purposes and medium such as film. Computer animation is essentially a digital alternative to the stop motion techniques used in traditional animation with 3D models and frame-by-frame animation of 2D illustrations. Computer generated animations are more controllable than more physically based processes, such as effects or crowd scenes, and it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible without the use of technology. It can allow a graphic artist to produce such content without the use of physical props reducing time and cost. To create the illusion of movement in an animation, an image is displayed on the screen and replaced by a new image with fractional changes and advanced slightly along a timeline the same as the process of historical flip books. Learners will explore the techniques and developments within the sector, the animation styles and formats currently emerging and the techniques used for these animations. Learners will then use software to develop a planned animation.

 

Useful websites and resources:

KS4:

 

GCSE Biology

Link to Subject website: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/biology-gcse/#tab_overview

Link to Specification: https://www.wjec.co.uk/umbraco/surface/blobstorage/download?nodeId=3085

Link to past papers and mark schemes: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/biology-gcse/#tab_pastpapers

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

Some parents also request a revision guide recommendation for the subject. Our recommendation is ‘CGP WJEC GCSE Biology Revision Guide’.

Link to revision book: https://www.cgpbooks.co.uk/secondary-books/gcse/science/biology/bwr41-wjec-gcse-biology-revision-guide-(with-onlin

GCSE Chemistry

WJEC Chemistry website:- https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/chemistry-gcse/#tab_overview

Specification link: https://www.wjec.co.uk/umbraco/surface/blobstorage/download?nodeId=3115

Past papers and mark schemes link: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/chemistry-gcse/#tab_pastpapers

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored to our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

Some parents also request a revision guide recommendation for the subject. Our recommendation is ‘CGP WJEC GCSE Chemistry Revision Guide’.

Link to revision book: https://www.cgpbooks.co.uk/secondary-books/gcse/science/chemistry/cwr41-wjec-gcse-chemistry-revision-guide-(with-onl

GCSE Physics

WJEC Physics website: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/physics-gcse/#tab_overview

Specification link:- https://www.wjec.co.uk/umbraco/surface/blobstorage/download?nodeId=3150

Blended Learning resources: https://resources.wjec.co.uk/Pages/ResourceByArgs.aspx?subId=24&lvlId=2

Past papers and mark schemes can be found at: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/physics-gcse/#tab_pastpapers

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

Some parents also request a revision guide recommendation for the subject. Our recommendation is ‘CGP WJEC GCSE Physics Revision Guide’.

Link to revision book: https://www.cgpbooks.co.uk/secondary-books/gcse/science/physics/pwr41-wjec-gcse-physics-revision-guide-(with-onlin

GCSE Double Award Science

Link to Subject website: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/science-double-gcse-award/#tab_overview

Link to Specification: https://www.wjec.co.uk/umbraco/surface/blobstorage/download?nodeId=3199

Link to past papers and mark schemes: https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/science-double-gcse-award/#tab_pastpapers

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored to our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

Some parents also request a revision guide recommendation for the subject. Our recommendation is ‘CGP WJEC Science Double Award- Revision’.

Link to revision book: https://www.cgpbooks.co.uk/secondary-books/gcse/science/swr41-wjec-gcse-science-double-award

GCSE Computer Science

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored to our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

GCSE ICT

The school has invested in an excellent revision resource called GCSEPod which provides short revision video clips tailored to our exam boards specification. We recommend that students use GCSEPod as part of their revision.

Link to GCSEPod: https://www.gcsepod.com/

We are currently welcoming applications to join our welcoming and vibrant Sixth Form for September 2024, please apply using the below link.

September 2024 Sixth Form Applications 

Crickhowell High School is closed today due to adverse weather. This decision is made in the best interest of everyone’s safety and wellbeing, following consultation with all partners.