Humanities

Vision Statement:

Our vision is that all students will engage with Humanities to become ethical, informed citizens of Wales and the world, through exploration of the human experience in their own localities and further afield. By investigating contemporary and historical contexts, learners will discover their heritage and develop a sense of place. Learners will consider a range of values, ethics and viewpoints. They will be encouraged to critically engage with, respect and challenge views, as well as to understand how to exercise their democratic rights in becoming enterprising, creative contributors, ready to play a full part in life and work.  We will enable learners to establish a solid base of knowledge and understanding of geographical, historical, religious/non-religious, business and social concepts, through learning experiences both in and outside the classroom. Learners will participate in different methods of enquiry, evaluate evidence and communicate their findings, helping them to become ambitious, capable learners, ready to learn throughout their lives. Learners will have the opportunities to discuss their personal perspectives on ethical challenges and social inclusion issues, as well as explore the world around them. These experiences will help build independence, increase self-confidence and self-esteem and support the development of healthy, confident individuals, ready to lead fulfilling lives as valued members of society.

 

AOLE Staff:

Mr M Jones: Director of Learning and Achievement Humanities

Mr L Hart: Deputy Director of Learning and Achievement Humanities

Mr L McErlaine: Deputy Director of Learning and Achievement Humanities

Mrs C Greenway: Business Studies, Law and Criminology Progress Leader Y12+Y13

Mrs G Walker: Geography, Progress Leader

Miss J Phillips: Psychology and Criminology

Mr S Murphy: History

Dr Francesca Dickson: Humanities Teacher

 

The Curriculum:

Year 7

Humanities will encompass disciplinary teaching of Geography, History and Religion Values and Ethics (RVE) being taught together with links made between Social Studies and Business Studies. The Year 7 Scheme of Learning consists of the following themes: Identity, Borders, Diversity, Health and Connections

 

Year 8

Humanities will encompass disciplinary teaching of Geography, History and Religion Values and Ethics (RVE) being taught together with links between Social Studies and Business Studies. The Year 8 Scheme of Learning consists of the following themes: details to follow…

Currently at the end of Year 8, learners complete their option choices where the following Humanities subjects are available to choose from for further study at GCSE: History, Geography and Business Studies.

GCSE Religious Studies is mandatory for at least the Short Course which is worth 50% of a full GCSE. This exam (UNIT 1: Religion and Philosophical Themes) is sat in Y10. Learners will be awarded half a GCSE for completion. If learners want to study the Full Course GCSE, they can in Y11 where they will complete UNIT 2: Religion and Ethical Themes. This is worth 50% and will be combined with the UNIT 1 exam in Y10 to make a full GCSE. This decision needs to be made before the Y10 exam entries are submitted in February each year.

 

Years 9-11 (GCSE)

We currently run a 3-year GCSE programme where learners start their GCSE study in Y9. During the first term in Y9, all subjects complete a pre-GCSE Skills programme where the GCSE Specification is then taught from the second term in all Humanities subjects. Below are some specific details about each GCSE which is available to learners.

 

GCSE Religious Studies

Religious Studies is a unique subject as it is not all about learning boring facts and figures. It challenges the way we think about life, the universe and everything! Religious Studies is the perfect course to deepen your knowledge and understanding of philosophy, ethics and eastern/western cultures and religion.

The table below provides a snapshot of what the GCSE course involves:

Unit 1: Religion and Philosophical Themes (Y9+10)
Part A: Christianity: Core Beliefs, Teachings and PracticesPart B: Christianity and Hinduism: Issues of Life and Death
Beliefs:

  • God
  • Jesus as God Incarnate
Practices:

  • Morality
  • Church
Areas of Study:

  • The World
  • The Origin and Value of Human Life
  • Beliefs about Death and the Afterlife
Part A: Hinduism: Core Beliefs, Teachings and PracticesPart B: Christianity and Hinduism: Issues of Good and Evil
Beliefs:

  • Brahman and Atman
  • Hindu Gods
Practices:

  • Worship
  • Rites of Passage
Areas of Study:

  • Crime and Punishment
  • Forgiveness / War and Peace
  • Good, Evil and Suffering
Unit 2: Religion and Philosophical Themes (Y11)
Part A: Christianity: Core Beliefs, Teachings and PracticesPart B: Christianity and Hinduism: Issues of Relationships
Beliefs:

  • The Bible
  • The Afterlife
Practices:

  • Life’s Journey
  • Special Places
Areas of Study:

  • Relationships
  • Sexual Relationships
  • Gender Equality
Part A: Hinduism: Core Beliefs, Teachings and PracticesPart B: Christianity and Hinduism: Issues of Human Rights
Beliefs:

  • Karma and Reincarnation
  • Varnasharamadharama
Practices:

  • Festivals
  • Social Concern
Areas of Study:

  • Human Rights and Social Justice
  • Prejudice and Discrimination
  • Issues of Wealth and Poverty

Throughout the course, students study ethical and philosophical themes while studying the beliefs of Christianity, Hinduism, Humanism and Atheism.

 

GCSE Geography:

Our GCSE Geography specification adopts an enquiry approach to the study of geographical information, issues and concepts.

It is based on the principle that geographical education should enable learners to become critical and reflective thinkers by engaging them actively in the enquiry process. Content is organised around key questions and learners should be encouraged to pose geographical questions of their own.

 

Summary of Assessment:

Unit 1: Changing Physical and Human Landscapes

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

40% of qualification 83 marks

Section A: Core Themes 

Two structured, data response questions assessing Core Theme 1

(Landscapes and Physical Processes) and Core Theme 2 (Rural-urban Links).

Section B: Options

One structured question (from a choice of two) assessing either Theme 3

(Tectonic Landscapes and Hazards) or Theme 4 (Coastal Hazards and their Management). These themes provide additional breadth of study for the content assessed in the core themes.

Assessment will be by data response questions.

Some questions will require extended responses.

 

Unit 2: Environmental and Development Issues

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

40% of qualification  83 marks

Section A: Core Themes 

Two structured, data response questions assessing Core Theme 5 (Weather, Climate and Ecosystems) and Core Theme 6 (Development and Resource Issues).

Section B: Options

One structured question (from a choice of two) assessing either Theme 7 (Social Development Issues) or Theme 8 (Environmental Challenges).  These themes provide additional depth of study for the content assessed in the core themes.

Assessment will be by data response questions.

Some questions will require extended responses.

 

Unit 3: Fieldwork Enquiry

Non-examination assessment: 2 hours 30 minutes

20% of qualification 44 marks

Unit 3 requires a written report from the learner, to include evidence of their understanding of the enquiry process and their independent ability to process/present data and complete extended writing. The report must be written in response to specific questions set by WJEC.

 

GCSE History:

GCSE History comprises of the following:

 

Year 9

  • Introduction to GCSE In-depth focus on the impact of the Great War and the wider historical context;
  • WJEC Germany in Transition Unit 2 c.1918-1939 (Examined unit in Year 10).
  • Key focus areas: Treaty of Versailles; Weimar Republic; Rise of the Nazis; Life in Hitler’s Germany; Steps to War.

 

Year 10

  • Completion of Unit 1 (if required)
  • WJEC DWR (Depression, War & Recovery) Unit 1 c.1929-1951 (Examined in Year 11)
  • WJEC NEA Unit 4.  Candidates will complete one of two Non-Examined Assessment questions, set by the centre in conjunction with WJEC.  Recent topics have included:- Black Civil Rights in the USA; Role of Women on the Home Front in Wales & England; Haig: The Butcher of the Somme?
  • Potential field trip to IWM, London

 

Year 11

  • Completion of Unit 2 (if required)
  • WJEC NEA Unit 4.  Candidates will complete one of two Non-Examined Assessment questions, set by the centre in conjunction with WJEC.  Recent topics have included:- Black Civil Rights in the USA; Role of Women on the Home Front in Wales & England; Haig: The Butcher of the Somme?
  • WJEC Unit 3 C&P Crime & Punishment

 

Summary of Assessment:

Unit 1: Studies in Depth – Wales and the wider perspective

Written examination: 1 hour

25% of qualification

This unit offers a choice of four Studies in Depth – each considering a Welsh perspective within a wider historical context.

Centres choose one Study in Depth from the following:

1A. The Elizabethan Age,1558-1603

1B. Radicalism and Protest,1810-1848

1C. Depression, War and Recovery, 1930-1951

1D. Austerity, Affluence and Discontent, 1951-1979

Each option will be assessed by compulsory questions. These will focus largely on the analysis and evaluation of historical sources and interpretations. There will also be questions testing second order historical concepts.

Unit 2: Studies in Depth – History with a European / world focus

Written examination: 1 hour

25% of qualification

This unit offers a choice of four Studies in Depth – each considering history in a European or wider world context.

Centres choose one Study in Depth from the following:

2A. Russia in Transition, 1905-1924

2B. The USA: A Nation of Contrasts, 1910-1929

2C. Germany in Transition, 1919-1939

2D. Changes in South Africa, 1948-1994

Each option will be assessed by compulsory questions. These will test second order historical concepts and also analyse and evaluate historical sources and interpretations.

Unit 3: Thematic studies  from a broad historical perspective

Written examination:  1 hour 15 minutes

30% of qualification

This unit offers a choice of four Thematic Studies that cover a specific aspect of history in breadth, with a particular emphasis on how this impacted on Wales.

Centres choose one Thematic Study from the following:

3A. Changes in Crime and Punishment, c.1500 to the present day

3B. Changes in Health and Medicine, c.1340 to the present day

3C. The Development of Warfare, c.1250 to the present day

3D. Changes in Patterns of Migration, c.1500 to the present day

The Thematic Study will include the study of an appropriate historic site and its significance.

Each study will be assessed by compulsory questions focusing extensively on second order historical concepts including continuity, change, cause, consequence, significance, similarity and difference.

Unit 4: Working as an historian

Non-Examination Assessment (NEA)

20% of qualification

The non-examination assessment will involve the completion of two separate tasks, one with a focus on source evaluation within the creation of an historical narrative and one with a focus on the formation of different historical interpretations of history.

The topics chosen for non-examination assessment must not replicate or overlap with the content of any of the examined units chosen.

 

GCSE Business Studies:

Learners will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, enabling them to use business information critically, to develop arguments, to make justified decisions and to prepare them for further study and career pathways. Our GCSE Business specification introduces learners to the business world, empowering them to develop as commercially minded and enterprising individuals.

 

Summary of Assessment:

Unit 1: Business World

Written examination: 2 hours

62.5% of qualification 100 Marks

A mix of short answer and structured questions based on stimulus material covering all of the specification content

 

Unit 2: Business Perceptions

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

37.5% of qualification 60 Marks

Data response questions covering all of the specification content

 

 

Sixth Form – A Levels and BTEC Subjects

The Humanities Faculty offers the following A Level Courses. Each subject has 4 hours each week of teaching time.

A Level Religious Studies:

Ever since humankind started to think, religion has been a fundamental part of our development.  As people look into the vastness of space or witness the miracle of birth, they contemplate the meaning of life and their own mortality.  It has always been this way. In the 21st Century, religion still addresses the same eternal human questions about life and death, values and relationships, right and wrong.

Religious Studies is an inclusive subject designed for people of any faith and people who have no faith. It isn’t necessary to have taken Religious Studies at GCSE, although students who have will find that the A Level course of study builds on their knowledge, understanding and skills. All that is required is a desire to find out more about religion and its role in society.

Click the link below to learn more about A Level Religious Studies.

https://spark.adobe.com/page/KLUIFzLZL1p1V/

 

Summary of Assessment:

AS Level consists of Unit 1 and Unit 2. A2 Level Consists of Unit 3, Unit 4 and Unit 5.

Unit 1: Buddhism (15%)Unit 2: Religion and Ethics & Philosophy of Religion (25%)
  1. Religious Figures and Sacred Texts
  2. Religious Concepts
  3. Religious Life
  4. Religious Practice
Religion and Ethics

  1. Ethical Language and Thought
  2. Aquinas’ Natural Law
  3. Fletcher’s Situation Ethics
  4. Utilitarianism

There will also be applied ethics: abortion, euthanasia, sexual ethics, animal experimentation for medical research, nuclear war and deterrence.

Philosophy of Religion

  1. Cosmological + Teleological Arguments
  2. Ontological Arguments
  3. The Problem of Evil
  4. Religious Experience
Unit 3: Buddhism (20%)Unit 4: Religion and Ethics (20%)
  1. Religious figures and sacred texts
  2. Significant historical developments in religious thought
  3. Significant social developments in religious thought
  4. Religious practices that shape religious identity
Religion and Ethics

  1. Ethical Language and Thought
  2. Deontological Ethics
  3. Contemporary developments in ethical theory
  4. Free Will and Determinism

There will also be applied ethics: applying ethical theories to immigration and capital punishment.

Unit 5: Philosophy of Religion (20%)
  1. Challenges to religious belief: Religion and Psychology + New Atheism
  2. Religious Experience: Faith and Miracles
  3. Religious Language [1]: Problems of using Religious Language
  4. Religious Language [2]: Symbol, Myth, Language Games, Religious Language in the 21st Century.

 

A Level: Law

Our AS/A Level Law specification enable learners to develop an understanding of both public and private law within the law of Wales and England and develop skills which will prepare them for further undergraduate study and future careers.

The specification enables learners to develop their ability to analyse both legal rules and principles and factual issues.

 

Summary of Assessment:

This specification is divided into a total of 4 units, 2 AS units and 2 A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1: The Nature of Law and the Welsh and English Legal Systems

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

25% of qualification 80 marks

Section A – Law making in Wales and England and the nature of law Three questions in total: two compulsory and one from a choice of two scenario based questions.

Section B – The Welsh and English legal systems and the nature of Law One question from a choice of two, each divided into part a) and b).

AS Unit 2: The Law of Tort

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

15% of qualification 60 marks

Five questions about the law of tort: a mixture of short answer and essay questions, including a scenario based question.

A Level (the above plus a further 2 units)

A2 Unit 3: The Practice of Substantive Law

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

30% of qualification 100 marks

One scenario based question from two different sections, selected from:

Human Rights Law

Law of Contract

Criminal Law

A2 Unit 4: Substantive Law Perspectives

Written examination: 2 hours

30% of qualification 100 marks

One essay question from two different sections, selected from:

Human Rights Law

Law of Contract

Criminal Law

A Level: Business Studies:

Learners will be introduced to the dynamic business environment and the importance of entrepreneurial activity in creating business opportunities and sustaining business growth. The focus of our AS/A Level Business specification is to nurture an enthusiasm for studying business using contemporary contexts, allowing learners to develop an appreciation of the strategic, complex and inter-related nature of business issues from a local to global perspective.

 

Summary of Assessment:

This specification is divided into a total of 4 units, 2 AS units and 2 A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS Unit 1
Business Opportunities
Written Examinations:1 Hour 15 Minutes
15% of Qualifications 60 Marks
Short answer and structured questions.
Business opportunities, business start-ups, SMEs and other types of business organisations and the markets in which they operate.
AS Unit 2
Business Functions
Written Examinations:2 Hours
25% of Qualification 80 Marks
Data response questions.
Covers the full AS content.

A Level (the above plus a further 2 units)

A2 Unit 3
Business Analysis and Strategy
Written Examination:2 Hours 15 Minutes
30% of Qualification 80 Marks

Data response plus structured questions.

Business strategy and analytical techniques used in the business decision-making process.

A2 Unit 4
Business in a Changing World
Written Examination 2 Hour 15 Minutes
30% of Qualification. 80 Marks
Case study plus one essay from a choice of three. Covers the full A level content.

 

A Level: Psychology

Our AS/A level specification is of the highest standard, is clear and accessible for teachers whilst engaging and rigorous for the students.

There are opportunities to study the classics of psychology whilst also introducing ongoing debates and topics which continue to fascinate learners.

 

Summary of Assessment:

This specification is divided into a total of 4 units, 2 AS units and 2 A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1
Psychology Past to Present
Written Examination 1 Hours 30 Minutes
20% of Qualification. 80 Marks

Compulsory questions relating to five psychological approaches and classic pieces of research.

 

AS Unit 2
Psychology:Using Psychology Concepts
Written Examination: 1 Hour 30 Minutes
20% of Qualification. 80 Marks

Section A: Contemporary debate

One question linked to the given debates.

Section B: Principles of research and application of research methods

Principles of research

Compulsory questions on the theory of psychological research (including the work of social and developmental psychologists).

Application of research methods to a novel scenario

Compulsory questions requiring a response to a piece of research previously unseen.

 

 

A Level (the above plus a further 2 units)

A2 Unit 3
Psychology: Implications in the Real World
Written ExaminationL 2 Hour 30 Minutes

Section A: The study of behaviours

Three structured essays from a choice of six.

Section B: Controversies in psychology

One question from a choice of two requiring a synoptic exploration of psychological controversies.

 

A2 Unit 4
Psychology: Applied Research Methods
Written Examination: 1 Hour 30 Minutes
20% of Qualification 60 Marks

Section A: Personal investigations

Compulsory questions based on investigative activities carried out prior to the assessment.

Section B: Application of research methods to novel scenarios Compulsory questions requiring a response to pieces of research.

 

 

A Level: Sociology

Our AS/A Level Sociology specification provides learners with the opportunity to develop an understanding of our changing society as well as opportunities to learn about sociological methods and research.

The choice of topics can be used to support vocational studies such as health and social care, nursing, and social work.

The WJEC AS and A Level in Sociology encourages learners to:

  • Acquire knowledge and a critical understanding of contemporary social processes and social changes;
  • Appreciate the significance of theoretical and conceptual issues in sociological debate;
  • Understand and evaluate sociological methodology and a range of research methods through active involvement in the research process;
  • Develop skills that enable individuals to focus on their personal identity, roles and responsibilities within society;
  • Develop a lifelong interest in social issues with reference to Wales in particular.

 

Summary of Assessment:

This specification is divided into a total of 4 units, 2 AS unit and 2 A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS Unit 1: Aquiring Culture
Written Examination:1 Hour 15 Minutes
15% of Qualification 60 Marks

Section A   15marks

This section comprises one structured question on the key concepts and processes of cultural transmission, socialisation and the acquisition of identity.

Section B   45 marks

This section offers a choice between two options:

  • families and households
  • youth cultures

Each option includes compulsory questions and a choice between two essay questions.

AS Unit 2: Understanding Society and Methods of Sociological Enquiry
Written Examination: 2 Hours
25% of Qualification 90 Marks

Section A  Methods of Sociological Enquiry   35 marks

This section comprises one compulsory question.  This will be based on stimulus material which will be a synopsis of a piece of sociological research.

Section B Understanding Society                         55 marks

This section offers a choice between three options:

  • education
  • media
  • religion

Each option includes compulsory questions based on data and a choice between two essay questions.

 

A2 Unit 3 Power and Control
Written Examination: 2 Hours
25% of Qualification. 70 Marks
The questions in this section are on the theme of power.  There is a choice between four options:

  • crime and deviance
  • health and disability
  • politics (for assessment in 2021 only)
  • world sociology

Each option includes compulsory questions and a choice between two essay questions.

A2 Unit 4: Social Inequality and Applied Methods of Sociological Enquiry
Written Examination: 2 Hours 15 Minutes
35% of Qualification. 100 Marks

Section A  Applied Methods of Sociological Enquiry   40 marks

One compulsory question which will require learners to design, justify and evaluate a piece of sociological research.

Section B Social Inequality                                                 60 marks

Questions in this section are on the theme of social differentiation and stratification.  These will include a compulsory question and a choice between two essay questions.

 

A Level: History

A Level History comprises of the following:

AS is worth 40% pf the overall qualification.

  • WJEC Unit 1 Tudors in Wales 7 England c. 1485-1603. Worth 20%, examined towards the end of Year 12.
  • WJEC Unit 2 Weimar Germany c.1918-1933. Worth 20%, examined towards the end of Year 12.
  • NEA Unit 5 is commenced immediately after the AS examinations. NEA is an independent piece of academic research.

A2 is worth 60% of the overall qualification.

  • Unit 3 Russia Breadth Study c.1881-c.1989
  • Unit 4 Nazi Germany Depth Study 1933-1945
  • Completion and submission of the NEA (Worth 20%) Unit 5 by Dec/Jan.
  • Core textbook titles are recommended by the Department but it is the responsibility of the student to provide them.
  • Wider reading is encouraged as a pre-requisite at A Level. Specific titles can be recommended by subject-specialist staff.

 

Summary of Assessment:

This specification is divided into a total of five units, two AS units and three A2 units. Weightings noted below are expressed in terms of the full A Level qualification.

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1

Period Study

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

20% of qualification 60 marks

Open ended questions with a focus on relevant historical concepts. One choice of period study from eight options.

AS Unit 2

Depth Study: Part 1

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

20% of qualification 60 marks

Evidence based questions with focus on the evaluation of historical sources and different interpretations.

One choice of depth study from eight options.

 

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3

Breadth Study

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

20% of qualification 60 marks

Essays focused on relevant historical concepts and based on historical themes One choice of breadth study from ten options.

A2 Unit 4

Depth Study: Part 2

Written examination: 1 hour 45 minutes

20% of qualification 60 marks

A source based question and an essay arising from further study of the depth study chosen for AS in Unit 2.

A2 Unit 5

Historical Interpretations

Non-examination assessment: 3000-4000 words

20% of qualification 60 marks

Focusing on a specific historical problem or issue.  The question set must not duplicate the content or duration of the depth study chosen in Units 2 and 4.

 

A Level: Geography

Our AS/A Level Geography specification encourages learners to apply geographical knowledge, theory and skills to the world around them.

In turn this will enable learners to develop a critical understanding of the world’s people, places and environments in the 21st Century.

 

Summary of Assessment:

AS (2 units)

AS Unit 1: Changing Landscapes

Written examination: 2 hours

24% of qualification 96 marks

Section A: Changing Landscapes

Choice between two themes, either Coastal or Glaciated Landscapes; two compulsory structured questions with data response

Section B: Tectonic Hazards

Three compulsory structured questions with data response

AS Unit 2: Changing Places

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes

16% of qualification 64 marks

Section A: Changing Places

Two compulsory structured questions with data response

Section B: Fieldwork Investigation in Physical and Human Geography

Three compulsory structured questions with data response on fieldwork and the learner’s own fieldwork investigation

A Level (the above plus a further 3 units)

A2 Unit 3: Global Systems and Global Governance

Written examination: 2 hours

24% of qualification 96 marks

Section A: Global Systems

Water and Carbon Cycles: two compulsory structured questions with data response and one extended response question

Section B: Global Governance: Change and Challenges Processes and patterns of global migration and global governance of the Earth’s oceans: two compulsory structured questions with data response and one extended response question

Section C: 21st Century Challenges

One compulsory extended response question drawing on

Units 1, 2 and 3 with resource material

A2 Unit 4: Contemporary Themes in Geography

Written examination: 2 hours

16% of qualification 64 marks

Section A: Tectonic Hazards

One compulsory extended response question Section B: Contemporary Themes in Geography Select two optional themes from four:

  • Ecosystems
  • Economic Growth and Challenge: India or China or Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Energy Challenges and Dilemmas
  • Weather and Climate

Two essay questions, one on each chosen theme

A2 Unit 5: Independent Investigation

Non-exam assessment: 3000 – 4000 words

20% of qualification 80 marks

One written independent investigation, based on the collection of both primary data and secondary information

 

Level 3 Diploma Criminology:

An understanding of criminology is relevant to many job roles within the criminal justice sector, social and probation work and sociology and psychology. WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology is a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology that complements studies in humanities. This is an Applied General qualification. This means it is designed primarily to support learners progressing to university. It has been designed to offer exciting and interesting experiences that focus learning for 16-19 year-old learners and adult learners through applied learning, i.e. through the acquisition of knowledge and understanding in purposeful contexts linked to the criminal justice system.

 

Summary of Assessment:

WJEC Level 3 Applied Diploma in Criminology

Unit

Number

Unit Title Assessment GLH
1Changing Awareness of CrimeMandatoryInternal90
2Criminological TheoriesMandatoryExternal90
3Crime Scene to CourtroomMandatoryInternal90
4Crime and PunishmentMandatoryExternal90

 

Learners must complete ALL units.

The first mandatory unit will enable the learner to demonstrate understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported.

The second mandatory unit will allow learners to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have learned in Unit 1.

The third mandatory unit will provide an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict. Learners will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.

In the final mandatory unit, learners will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.

 

Useful Websites/Resources:

Below are a list of useful websites and resources that you may find useful:

https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/

(This is the main website to find information about each GCSE and A Level course. Search for the subject you would like information about. There are digital materials that may be useful to learners on here too).

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/levels/z98jmp3

(This is for GCSE learners. Find the relevant Humanities subject that you want to revise. Contains information and short tests to aid revision.)

 

Microsoft Teams

(Most of your class materials and additional resources can be found on here for you.)

Speak to your subject teachers if you require any additional resources to aid your learning – this can be printed or digital.

We are currently welcoming applications to join our welcoming and vibrant Sixth Form for September 2024, please apply using the below link.

September 2024 Sixth Form Applications 

Crickhowell High School is closed today due to adverse weather. This decision is made in the best interest of everyone’s safety and wellbeing, following consultation with all partners.